Australian Charities and Not For Profits Commission Endorsed Charity Tick

Midnight Basketball Australia
 is an Endorsed ACNC Charity

 

HOW TO VOLUNTEER & SUPPORT

 

Become A Tournament Night Volunteer

Volunteer Information

Working With Children Information

BECOME A TOURNAMENT NIGHT VOLUNTEER

Midnight Basketball provides volunteers with a unique, significant and personally rewarding opportunity to be engaged in a local program. We couldn't run it without your support.

It is also flexible – when you register, simply add your available date(s) – from 1 to 8 weeks - and preferred role(s) and we will do all we can to meet your availability.

Some roles require more experience, such as coaching or catering, than others which you can be trained to undertake. Training and support is provided.

Midnight Basketball Australia requires all volunteers to have a current Working With Children (WWC) check prior to attending a Midnight Basketball Tournament. A copy of your WWC check will need to be provided to the Volunteer Manager.

 

Bus Logistics

Bus Supervisor

Catering Helper

Coach / Coach Assistant

General Assistant

Grader - Week 1 Only

Laundry Volunteer

Mentoring Session Supervisor

Registration Helper

Scorer

Scoreboard Operator

 

BUS LOGISTICS

On Arrival

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and collect your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard with bus lists from the Tournament Night Manager.

Responsibilities

  • Liaise with Coaches to determine which players require bus home (noted on Coach Report).
  • Coordinate the drop-offs in a sensible and logical order (based on suburb listing).
  • Brief Bus Driver and Bus Supervisor on bus route night.

Bus Departure Time

  • 11:25pm

Note: This time is based on our optimum schedule and should be used as a guide only. Check with the Tournament Night Manager for bus departures specific to your tournament.

PRIOR to bus departures:

  • Provide Bus Supervisor with copy of required bus list.

Bus Lists

There are two bus lists in the folder:

  • One alphabetical listing by suburb
  • One alphabetical listing by surname

End of Night

  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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BUS SUPERVISOR

On Arrival (10:15pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and collect your nametag/lanyard.
  • Introduce yourself to Bus Logistics and Bus Driver.

Responsibilities

  • Check off each player as they get on the bus.
  • Assist Bus Driver with navigation of bus route provided by Bus Logistics.
  • Once a player is dropped off, have them sign off on the bus list next to their name and record the time of drop off.
  • Yellow Card can be issued to a player for inappropriate behaviour. Refer Midnight Basketball Rules and Code of Conduct.
  • If Yellow Card issued, record details on an Incident report form.

Bus Departure Time

  • 11:25pm

Note: This time is based on our optimum schedule and should be used as a guide only. Check with the Tournament Night Manager for bus departures specific to your tournament.

Bus Lists

There are two bus lists in the folder:

  • One alphabetical listing by suburb
  • One alphabetical listing by surname

End of Night

  • Write your name on the top right hand corner of bus list.
  • Ensure form is complete.
  • Confirm that paperwork (bus lists, Incident reports etc) and folder have been handed back to Tournament Night Manager (either by yourself or the Bus Driver).

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CATERING HELPER

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard from the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Set up ready for players' dinner including seating and tablecloths.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (7:05pm) .

On Players Arrival (7:30pm)l

  • Supervise arrival of players to meals area, direct to team tables.
  • Coordinate serving of dinner, ensuring all players and volunteers are fed prior to seconds being offered.
  • Ensure all players and volunteers are sitting together at tables, with players seated with their team.
  • Report any inappropriate behaviour or concerns to Youth Worker or Tournament Night Manager.
  • Assist with clearing up after dinner – encourage all players to place their plates etc in the bins provided.
  • Pack up and tidy up kitchen areas.
  • Feel free to watch the games which commence at 8pm.

End of Night

  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

NUTRITION AND CATERING

Why are healthy food choices important for young people?

Major causes of obesity in children are unhealthy food choices and lack of physical activity. Providing healthy food choices is critical in reducing overweight and obesity rates. Adequate consumption of fruit and vegetables is a protective factor against many diseases including coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and many forms of cancer. Good eating habits are important during adolescence as it is a period of rapid growth and development. Regular healthy eating improves young people’s ability to think, their attentiveness, their ability to socially interact and helps to maintain a healthy body weight.

Why is this a responsibility of Midnight Basketball?

Midnight Basketball has strong ethical and professional guidelines including no drugs or tobacco, alcohol, fast food, soft drinks or organisations that may contribute negative or unclear support for the health and wellbeing messages of the program. Midnight Basketball provides an ideal place to be exposed to healthy food choices that may not otherwise be available within their family or social environment.

How can we encourage and support healthy food messages on a Tournament Night?

  • Ensure water is easily accessible to everyone including availability of cups.
  • Ensure no soft drinks, fast foods, lollies, chocolates, cakes or chips are brought into the venue.
  • Ensure food is cooked with low fat, salt, sugar and high fruit and vegetable principles.
  • Remove vending machines from site. If not possible, turn them off and cover them.
  • Support healthy food messages by role modelling and discussing the benefits of healthy eating.
  • Stick to the rules and make no exceptions; this includes volunteers and spectators.

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COACH / COACH ASSISTANT

On Arrival (6:30pm7pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect team clipboard from Tournament Night Manager - will contain Coach Report including Stadium Sign-In/Sign-Out ('Coach Report').
  • Collect team bag - includes singlets and basketball from Tournament Night Manager.
  • Familiarise yourself with your team’s schedule for the night.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (7:05pm).
  • Go to your team table for dinner/player sign-in.

On Players’ Arrival (6:55pm)

  • Greet your players as they arrive.
  • Distribute the team singlets to players (try and keep consistent each week).
  • Players to sign-in on Coach Report, including singlet number and whether catching bus home (tick) or leaving with a parent/guardian.
  • Enjoy dinner with your players (sit together at team table).
  • If you are short of players by 7:50pm, please notify the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Give the completed Coach Report to the Scorers.

Mentoring Session

  • Supervise players during the session – all players attend.
  • Ensure that all balls, etc remain in your care.
  • Ensure players complete their Mentoring Session Feedback Form. If a player does not complete their form they cannot play in any matches for the rest of the night.

Matches

  • Refer to Midnight Basketball Rules and Code of Conduct.
  • Manage subbing of players, tactics and time outs - be fair and consistent.
  • Ensure your team is on time for all games - refer to your Coach Report in team folder.
  • Ensure players are well hydrated before, during and after each game - check the water procedure with the Tournament Night Manager.

After Final Game

  • Select a player to receive the Best & Fairest award and record on Coach Report.
  • During Best & Fairest presentation announce why player received the award. Always shake players hand and pass (not throw) the award to them.
  • Congratulate all players.
  • Retrieve singlets from all your players and place in team bag after the presentation is complete.
  • Supervise your players’ departure; i.e. bus or parent/guardian - have them sign-out as they depart.
  • Return team bag containing clipboard (with completed paperwork), singlets and team basketball to the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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GENERAL ASSISTANT

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard with paperwork from the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Assist the Catering Helper with dinner/seating set-up.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (6:55pm).

On Players Arrival (7pm)

  • Supervise the arrival of the players to the meals area, directing to team tables.
  • Assist the Caterer/Catering Helper with the serving of dinner, ensuring that all players and volunteers are fed prior to seconds being offered.
  • Assist with clearing up after player dinner - encourage all players to place their plates etc in the bins provided.

Mentoring Session/Game Time (8pm onwards)

  • Assist with the serving of spectator/parent dinner. Enjoy your own dinner also.
  • Assist the Caterers with any pack up if required.
  • General supervision of players (refer to Code of Conduct), covering:
  • indoor basketball court areas;
  • outside areas; and
  • male/female bathrooms.
  • Feel free to watch the games which commence at 8pm.

General Tasks

  • Assist Coaches with rounding up their players before their game if required.
  • Ensure no players leave the immediate vicinity of the venue.
  • Report any inappropriate behaviour or concerns to Youth Worker or Tournament Night Manager.
  • Assist the Coaches with the departure of players on buses as required.
  • Assist with pack up of venue.
  • Check with Tournament Night Manager if there are any tasks that require assistance for the night, or if any role has gone unfilled that you could assist with, for example, a rostered volunteer doesn't attend on the night.

End of Night

  • Return clipboard to Tournament Night Manager.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.
  • Please Note: If there is no role for you please feel free to go home if you wish. Please let the Tournament Night Manager know before you go home.

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GRADER - WEEK 1 ONLY

Requirements

Graders are required to have a basketball background or at the very least, basketball knowledge.

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard with paperwork from the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (6:55pm).
  • Watch all games played on the court you are assigned.
  • Use the grading sheet provided to make notes on the players - their height, age and gender will pre-populate on the report for those players already registered.

End of Night

  • Liaise with other Graders, Tournament Night Manager and Referees if appropriate to compare Grading notes and devise initial team allocations. Remember, teams should have a good mix of gender, age, height, skill level and other considerations to make the teams as evenly matched as possible.
  • Return clipboard to Tournament Night Manager.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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LAUNDRY VOLUNTEER

Responsibilities

  • Collect all player singlets in the Player Singlet Wash Bag after tournament night EACH WEEK.
  • Wash all singlets carefully in cold water and hang dry - NEVER in dryer.
  • Ensure they are returned to the Logistics Manager prior to next tournament night.
  • Singlets to be returned in team sets, along with the Player Singlet Wash Bag.

Post Tournament

  • Soak singlets in Napisan if required to remove any stubborn stains.
  • Complete stock take of all singlets after last week of Tournament (template provided by Tournament Night Manager).

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MENTORING SESSION SUPERVISOR

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect your clipboard from Tournament Night Manager along with any requirements specific to the mentoring session e.g. markers, butchers paper etc.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (7:05pm).

On Players Arrival (7pm)

  • Enjoy some dinner (sit with players) before the games begin.

Session Set-Up (7:45pm)

  • Move to session area.
  • Introduce yourself to the Mentoring Session Facilitator.
  • Help with set-up.
  • Ensure any materials required are on-hand for Facilitator and players.

During Session(s)

  • 5 minutes prior to commencement, round up Coaches and teams.
  • Help Coaches keep their players involved and assist if required.
  • Call on Youth Worker or Tournament Night Manager if necessary, for particularly difficult players.
  • Assist Facilitator if called upon.
  • Ensure players complete their Mentoring Session Feedback Form at the end of the session.

End of the Session

  • Hand clipboard and any other materials used during the session back to Tournament Night Manager.
  • Enjoy the rest of the night’s matches or leave at your will.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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REGISTRATION HELPER

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard with paperwork from the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (6:55pm).

Player Arrival (7pm)

  • As each player arrives, check the 'Player Contact Details Current Tournament' report to see if they are already registered.
  • If yes, highlight their name and direct them into the stadium.
  • If no, have them and their parent/guardian complete a Player Registration Form.
  • Provide assistance with completing the form if required.
  • Once completed review and check that all required fields have been completed and are correct.
  • If the player does not have a parent/guardian with them take the player to the Youth Worker, so consent can be obtained over the phone.

Note: If a laptop and internet is made available in the stadium, you will enter new registrations via the Player Registration Link on the community's public Midnight Basketball website.

Prior to Game Commencement at 8pm

  • Liaise with Coaches to double check that all players allocated to their team for Grading are registered.
  • Ensure that any player who is not registered completes a Registration Form PRIOR to participating in any Tournament night elements.
  • Confirm with Tournament Night Manager who the designated.

During the night

  • Liaise with the other Registration Helpers to divide Player Registration lists evenly.
  • Systematically work through checking registration details of your allocated players:
  • Take players aside one-by-one throughout the night - preferably during games - to the Youth Manager who will check their registration details with them.
  • Explain that while it may seem mundane, completing forms correctly is a valuable life skill eg will do many times for things like completing job applications, opening bank accounts etc.
  • Once their details are checked, cross their name off the 'Player Contact Details Current Tournament' report and escort player back to their team.

End of the Night

  • Return all Player Contact Details Current Tournament reports, to the Tournament Night Manager, as well as the names of newly registered Players whose details have been reviewed.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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SCORER

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Collect clipboard with scoresheets from the Tournament Night Manager.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (6:55pm).

On Players Arrival (7:00pm – 7:30pm)

  • Ensure the Coach Report including Stadium Sign-in/Sign-Out ('Coach Report') is being completed by the Players/Coaches.
  • Enjoy some dinner (sit with players) before the games begin.
  • 7:50pm. Collect Coach Report from Coaches and update all score sheets with player details - be court-side ready for start. Hand Coach Reports back to Coaches once score sheets have been updated.

Indicative Match Schedule (8pm to Midnight) - Standard 2 Court Format: 6 Teams

  • Each match has 2 x 14 min halves, 2 minute half time:
    8:05pm Match 1 / 2 8:35pm - 10min swap over
    8:45pm Match 3 / 4 9:15pm - 5min swap over
    9:20pm Match 5 / 6 9:50pm - 5min swap over
    9:55pm Match 7 / 8 10:25pm - 5min swap over
    10:30pm Match 9 11:00pm - 5min swap over
    11:25pm  

    Night concludes / depart

  • There will be one Scorer and a Scoreboard Operator per match.

Match Rules

  • Time Outs - Each team is allowed 2 time outs during a match. Mark the number i.e. 1, 2 in the boxes under Time Outs.
  • Fouls - Referee will advise when a foul has been called on a player – cross the box beside the player name each time a foul is called. When a player has 5 fouls advise the Referee.
  • Running Score.
  • The A column refers to Team A as written at the top of the sheet. B Column refers to Team B as written at the top of sheet.
  • As shots are made, cross off the corresponding number of points for Team A or Team B and record the player’s singlet number against that goal.
  • Write the half time scores in the bottom left hand corner and circle the score on the running score.
  • Write the final score and winning team in the bottom right hand corner.
  • Check both scoresheets correspond throughout the game and with the scoreboard.
  • Yellow Card - If a Referee issues a yellow card to a player, please record the player’s number in the box under the ‘yellow card’ section. If a player receives 3 yellow cards, notify the Referee.

After Final Matches of the Night

  • Hand all completed score sheets back to the Tournament Night Manager at the end of the night.
  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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SCOREBOARD OPERATOR

On Arrival (6:30pm)

  • Sign the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and pick up your nametag/lanyard.
  • Attend the Volunteer Briefing Session (6:55pm).

On Player Arrival (7pm)

  • General supervision and assist where needed.
  • Familiarise yourself with the score board operating system.
  • Enjoy some dinner (sit with Players) before the games begin.

Prior to Game Commencement at 8pm

  • Referees and Scorers will arrive - introduce yourself.
  • Be courtside ready to start at 7:55pm.
  • Set the scoreboard ready for the first game (14 minute half).

Indicative Match Schedule (8pm to Midnight) - Standard 2 Court Format: 6 Teams

  • Each match has 2 x 14 min halves, 2 minute half time:
    8:05pm Match 1 / 2 8:35pm - 10min swap over
    8:45pm Match 3 / 4 9:15pm - 5min swap over
    9:20pm Match 5 / 6 9:50pm - 5min swap over
    9:55pm Match 7 / 8 10:25pm - 5min swap over
    10:30pm Match 9 11:00pm - 5min swap over
    11:25pm  

    Night concludes / depart

  • There will be one Scorer and a Scoreboard Operator per match. You can assist the Scorer by writing ‘light’ or dark’ beside the team names on the score sheet so that the scoreboard corresponds to these teams.
  • Each team is allowed 2 time outs per match.

Scoreboard Operation

  • Light team will generally be the lighter coloured shirts than the dark team.
  • Use the [Score +] to add points for a team.
  • Use the [Score –] to take points off a team.
  • Continually check with the Scorers to ensure scores are correct.

After Each Game

  • Reset the scoreboard by pressing the Reset button in the scoring section.

After Final Matches of the Night

  • Sign out on the Volunteer Sign-In/Sign-Out Sheet and hand back nametag/lanyard.

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“You will get more out of this than the players! Everything about the tournament including the amazing Midnight Basketballers, is inspiring and you can really make a difference. I have really enjoyed myself.”
Volunteer Assistant Coach, Midnight Basketball

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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VOLUNTEER INFORMATION

WWC State by State Information

WWC Statement of Commitment

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Volunteering All About

What Can I Offer As A Volunteer

Ice Breakers - How To Engage With Midnight Basketball Players

How To Provide Positive Feedback To Players

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Midnight Basketball highly values its Volunteers and recognises that the volunteering experience must be one of mutual benefit. The contribution of Volunteers supports many great initiatives at Midnight Basketball as well as the program itself and provides support often not able to be provided otherwise.Midnight Basketball also provides Volunteers with an opportunity to role model appropriate behaviours and gives young people a contact point for connection to Community.

As a Volunteer what can I offer?

As an adult you have developed many life skills either through family, study, work or being involved in your community. The ability for you to demonstrate what you have learnt by role modelling positive behaviours and providing opportunities for local youth to meet new people is an invaluable experience for the youth participants and also for yourself.

Do I have to be young to be a volunteer?

No, not at all. All people across all ages, diversity, backgrounds and cultural groups are welcome and encouraged to be involved in Midnight Basketball.

What do I wear?

Comfortable, relaxed, neat clothing, with runners, flats or other enclosed shoes. No thongs are allowed.

Do I need to bring anything?

You do not need to bring anything with you. No money is required. Please do not bring lollies, soft drink, fast food, cigarettes or other harmful items into Midnight Basketball Tournaments. Water is provided.

Will I be required to drive anyone home?

No. The Midnight Basketball Program provides local buses and drivers to drive each Midnight Basketball player home to their doorstep at the end of the Tournament Night.

Is a meal provided?

Yes. A nutritious meal is provided to all Midnight Basketball Players and Volunteers. Midnight Basketball does not allow fast food, lollies or soft drinks to be part of the food provided or available on Tournament Nights. Midnight Basketball aims to create healthy environments that role model healthy behaviour for young people. Water is also provided. Please sit at team tables with the Players for dinner, even if you have eaten. It can feel uncomfortable to have people standing around watching you eat dinner, and it’s a great way to get to know each other.

Could my personal details be used for marketing purposes?

Absolutely not. Midnight Basketball maintains data about its Tournaments for reporting and analysis purposes only. No personal details are distributed to any third parties for any purpose.

Do I have to understand the rules of Basketball?

No, not at all. There are many people who will be able to assist you if you are required to help with the Tournament. There are also many other tasks/opportunities that are required to keep Midnight Basketball running smoothly, including help with dinner and setting up workshop rooms. Tournament organisers will match your skills and interests with the tasks on the night.

Does the Code of Conduct apply to everyone?

It is tremendously important to the ethic of the program that the Code of Conduct applies to everyone. We can hardly ask our youth to modify their behaviour if, as adults, we aren't prepared to also.  Examples include smoking, swearing, courtesy and other behaviours that appear on the Code of Conduct along with the Midnight Basketball Rules. By showing this leadership, you will be supporting the Tournament Night Manager, Youth Worker, Coaches and the rest of the Volunteers in implementing these positive behaviours and helping our youth learn by example.

Can I smoke?

Smoking is not permitted during Midnight Basketball tournament nights (including breaks) by Players, Volunteers or spectators. Midnight Basketball aims to create healthy environments that role model healthy behaviour for young people, and as outlined above supports the Players’ Code of Conduct.

Why are healthy food choices so important for young people?

Major causes of obesity in children are unhealthy food choices and lack of physical activity. Providing healthy food choices is critical in reducing overweight and obesity rates. Adequate consumption of fruit and vegetables is a protective factor against many diseases including coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and many forms of cancer. Good eating habits are important during adolescence as it is a period of rapid growth and development. Sufficient nutritious food is needed to support growth and normal development.

In 2010 nearly 30% of young people (13-17 years) were either overweight or obese. From 1985 to 1995 the number of overweight 7-15 year olds almost doubled. The numbers of obese children has more than tripled. It is predicted that 65% of young Australians will be overweight or obese by 2020. Regular healthy eating improves young people’s ability to think, their attentiveness, their ability to socially interact and helps to maintain a healthy body weight.

Why is this a responsibility of Midnight Basketball?

Midnight Basketball has strong ethical and professional guidelines regarding sponsorship of the program. These include no drugs or tobacco, alcohol, fast food, soft drinks or organisations that may contribute negative or unclear support for the health and wellbeing messages of the program.

How can we encourage and support healthy food messages on a Tournament Night?

As outlined above, we need to provide clear consistent messages and not make exceptions no matter how small they seem at the time. You can help through the following:

  • Ensure water is easily accessible to everyone including availability of cups.
  • Always make sure there is no access to soft drinks, fast foods, lollies, chocolates, cakes or chips, and that they are not brought into the venue.
  • Ensure food is cooked with low fat, salt, sugar and high fruit and vegetable principles.
  • Remove vending machines from areas Midnight Basketballers will be able to see them. If not possible, turn them off and place ‘out of order’ signs on them.
  • Support healthy food messages by role modelling and discussing with Players the benefits of healthy eating, including fitness and energy level benefits of eating good food on tournament nights.

What do I do if a young person raises a personal issue or an issue that may raise concern with me?

Each Tournament Night will have a professional Youth Worker in attendance. This is a requirement of the Midnight Basketball Program. The Youth Worker is qualified to address any issues that may arise and is able to provide support and information to the young person. You should discuss any issues with the Youth Worker.

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WHAT IS VOLUNTEERING ALL ABOUT

Welcome to Midnight Basketball!

Our volunteers are the backbone of Midnight Basketball and provide a never ending list of skills and support to enable Midnight Basketball to be a worthwhile experience for our youth.

Please have a read of the following information to help you understand the valuable role that volunteers play and what may be some of the great experiences you can look forward to by being involved with Midnight Basketball.

Why do people volunteer?

  • To help others and make a difference in their Community. To give back.
  • To be involved in their Community.
  • To contribute to a cause they care for or are passionate about.
  • To use skills they have in productive ways.
  • To teach and exchange skills and ideas.
  • To develop new skills and have a unique experience.
  • To meet new people and make friends.
  • To fulfil community service components of a study program or course.
  • To gain work experience.
  • To help make their Community a better place for all members.

Volunteering

Volunteer roles should be developed according to the principle that they add value to an organisation in a way that paid roles do not. Volunteers add value by bringing skills, knowledge and a willingness to make a positive contribution that opens up new possibilities for the organisation and the Community. They take on responsibilities and contribute in a way that assists the organisation to carry out its objectives, and they also provide the organisation with resources that it wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

Volunteering on a Committee or Board

Generally speaking the role of any volunteer on a Committee or Board is to provide broad-based input into planning and decision-making about particular issues or events in their Community.

With this is mind, Committee selection is an important consideration. The range of interests and skills must be broad enough to represent the aims of the organisation including who the program is aiming to attract.

Supporting Volunteers

Organisations that have a positive impact in the Community build strong volunteer networks. They value their volunteer base and create exceptional experiences to assist their volunteer base to emotionally ‘connect’ with the organisation’s or programs core values and mission. The volunteers also receive something in return: they are connected, inspired and transformed in the process of working for a cause.

Websites, email updates and newsletters are valuable tools to communicate experiences, and face to face opportunities for connection are all important to support and retain volunteers. Access to the internet and/or computers to enable the downloading of materials is important in volunteer management.

All volunteers should obtain the knowledge and skills required to fulfil their role. Feedback about their contribution and recognition is needed to ensure they can effectively carry out their responsibilities. Volunteers may work on projects because they feel strongly about the mission and vision of the organisation or program but make no mistake, everyone wants to be recognised for their efforts.

Written Role Descriptions must be provided to allow managers and volunteers to understand the nature of the agreed work.

Training Volunteers

The value and necessity of training for volunteers is widely accepted as being important. Volunteers should receive training from the organisation that is relevant to the work that is expected to be carried out.

Training may be delivered in a number of ways:

  • Face to face training workshops and seminars;
  • Self-paced, that is, at home or the workplace;
  • Distributing information in the form of brochures, induction packs, speeches at volunteer events, and/or website/email contact with the organisation;
  • Providing podcasts, You Tube, video clips which provide volunteers the opportunity of downloading programs to their computer so they listen in their own time;
  • Printed materials such as translating organisational findings in volunteer program newsletters.

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WHAT CAN I OFFER AS A VOLUNTEER

There is no doubt you will have had many and varied life experiences, including the experience of difficult and challenging times plus enjoyable and memorable moments. Whatever your own personal or professional experience, you have developed life skills that you can teach, role model, demonstrate and impart to young people.

Below are some life skills that you may not even realise you have.

What you have to offer

  • You know how to be kind and considerate to people.
  • You know how to be respectful and courteous to people.
  • Demonstrate manners at meal times and when interacting with other people.
  • You may have been a parent or carer of young people and have developed an understanding about their needs and stages of development.
  • Your work experience – think about what you have learnt about negotiation, achievement, reward, teamwork, acceptance and disappointment and use these skills during Tournament nights. Think about what worked best for you. Remember young people are only starting out on the journey of learning these skills. Share your experiences of getting part-time or casual jobs, training or apprenticeships. Perhaps how starting work was initially not full time but lots of small experiences and what these experiences were like for you. Reflect on the varied life lessons and skills these experiences taught you and why they were important to you.
  • What did you learn about at school? What was your experience of studying and learning? What things did you find hard?
  • How have you overcome any difficulties you have had? How did you learn to cope? What could you share with young people about this experience?
  • Think about any previous experiences you may have had with other groups, sporting or other clubs. Did you do any administration, catering, rostering, equipment organising?
  • You have an understanding of personal presentation and social etiquette in public, role model these to young people.
  • You know about the importance of hygiene and why it is important to look after yourself.
  • You have developed your own set of values and beliefs but you also recognise other people have differing views – by being understanding about differences of opinion or views you might encounter, and talking about them, you will show leadership about how to respect differences.
  • Keep young people informed about local issues whether it is the environment, social issues, education and employment – knowledge is power to all people.
  • You have set and reached personal and professional goals. Think about how you went about this and what skills and tools you used along the way.

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ICE BREAKERS - HOW TO ENGAGE WITH MIDNIGHT BASKETBALL PLAYERS

Talking to, working with and engaging with young people is sometimes challenging for adults.

For some it can be easy and others find it quite difficult. What we need to remember is that any effort to acknowledge and talk with a young person is worthwhile. It is a normal experience for any relationship with a young person to perhaps be slow to develop at first but it will become easier over time as young people and adults come to get to know each other and trust each other - so don't stop trying!!

Please remember to keep questions general and not personal or intimidating, you have a professional and responsible role at Midnight Basketball and trust in and care of Players is our priority.

Tips

  • Non face to face conversation is OK; eye to eye contact is not always comfortable initially for youth.
  • Working together on a task creates a distraction and allows general conversation to occur more readily, for example:
    • ask questions about the night; structure, what is coming up, what has happened, etc.
    • what was the score in the last game?
    • ask about how the scoring works
  • At the drinks point, take on the task of writing names on drink cups by asking each young person their name. Try to remember as many names as possible and always use that young person’s name when speaking to them. Do not use general nicknames e.g.: young fella, boy, kid. If you have forgotten, ask again. And don't forget to always introduce yourself.
  • Laugh and have a sense of humour, young people love to play and hear jokes (make sure it is appropriate – no discrimination, racism, gender bias, slang or swearing). Laugh with young people and not at young people. It is a joy to find how funny they can be.
  • Look to assign tasks (check with the Tournament Night Manager if not sure), for example, if you are a Coach, ask a Player to be in charge of basketballs on the night and ‘check in’ with them. Praise them for managing the responsibility well.
  • Ask questions about their favourite bands or singers. If you don’t know them that’s OK, have them tell you about their music style and what they know about that band or singer. It can be very enlightening!
  • Ask questions about favourite football teams (AFL, Football, League or Rugby) and how they are doing this year. Ask about favourite players and if they watch them on TV or go to any matches.
  • Ask about computer games they like to play. If you don’t know the game, ask them to tell you about it. Do they play with friends? Family?
  • Ask about any job aspirations. Tell them about your own work history – including difficult jobs, jobs you did and didn’t like and any opportunities you had and how they come about. Share a story.
  • Following on from any conversation about work, ask them if they know what study they might have to do to fulfil their aspirations? Provide any information you may have that could be useful.
  • Silences are OK. Stick with it, young people can take longer to respond, it’s normal.
  • Always use a handshake and aim to gain eye contact when introducing yourself, being introduced or congratulating a Player during presentations. Remember, you have wonderful opportunities to role model respect and manners towards other people during a Midnight Basketball Tournament Night.
  • Ask if the Player knows anyone else at Midnight Basketball. Use your experience to introduce the Player to other people as they may be reluctant.
  • Listen non-judgementally. We all have beliefs and values about life; do not impose these inappropriately on young people.
  • Be aware of your own body language. Be open and approachable; always place yourself at the same level as the young person, for example: if they are sitting, sit with them. Do not stand over young people as this may be intimidating.
  • Respect personal spaces, the culture and identity of Players. Remember they can teach us too.
  • Be brave. Reach out. Kindness has a powerful effect on everyone.
  • Above all, be yourself; be patient, calm and caring in your approach. Do not use jargon you are not familiar with. Young people do not care to do things just because 'that's how you did it'. However, they are like sponges and will listen and absorb common sense (it seeps in; remember we all learnt somehow). While the young live in the here and now and face daily challenges, teenage years are a time of important formative learning for adulthood and the responsibilities that come with it.

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HOW TO PROVIDE POSITIVE FEEDBACK TO PLAYERS

There will be many moments at Midnight Basketball Tournaments when the players demonstrate respect, care, help and manners towards others. It is important to recognise and acknowledge these moments, however small, as providing recognition contributes to positive self worth, self esteem, self respect and confidence in players. These all contribute to positive mental health in young people and enable them to feel valued and cared for by their local community, leading to a desire to be part of it.

Here are some situations you will come across that provide golden opportunities for praise:

  • A player being polite to someone else. "That was kind, thanks."
  • A player helping without being asked. "That was helpful, thankyou."
  • A player helping with cleaning up. "Thank you."
  • A player accepting an umpire’s decision even if they are not happy. "Good for you. Let me know if you didn't understand the decision."
  • Congratulating another player for winning or fair play. “Well done.”
  • Sharing the ball with everyone on court. "Nice passing. Great team work."
  • Accepting court time decisions. “That’s very mature of you. Well done.”
  • Players thanking catering staff for dinner. "That was great to thank them. They have been preparing the food all day. They will appreciate that a lot."
  • Shaking hands with the opposition at the end of the game. "Good sportsmanship."
  • Shaking hands to congratulate other players. “Well done. That shows real maturity.”
  • Giving a high-five to a player who is replacing a player on court. "Good team spirit.”
  • Being patient throughout the Tournament Night. “That’s very respectful of you.”
  • Listening well in Mentoring sessions. "Well done for being so attentive.”
  • Thanking Mentoring session facilitators. “That was good of you. A lot of work goes into preparing the sessions, so they will appreciate that.”
  • Being friendly towards new players. "That was really nice of you to be so welcoming."
  • Smiling and involving other players in the team. “Good work with utilising the whole team.”

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WORKING WITH CHILDREN INFORMATION

As a Harm Prevention Charity, protecting our youth is paramount. To ensure this, we need your support with the following:

WWC Statement of Commitment

Applying for a WWC Check

WWC CONCERNS? Please contact your Chair or MBAustralia.

WWC STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT

Midnight Basketball Australia is committed to the safety and wellbeing of all children and young people, including those who use our services. Our workers will treat them with respect and understanding and address their concerns at all times. Our organisation will endeavour to provide a safe and supportive service environment for children and young people through adherence to best practice WWC policies and practices.

 

Code of Conducct

Who must comply with the Code of Conduct: This Code of Conduct applies to all paid roles, volunteers, parents, and any other adults or young people who are involved in the setting up and running of Midnight Basketball Tournaments.

  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person, regardless of their abilities, gender, religion or cultural background.
  • Support all efforts to remove any form of abuse in the organisation and encourage a safe and supportive service environment.
  • Ensure that any physical contact with others is appropriate to the situation and necessary for the person’s skill development.
  • Refrain from developing close personal relationships with the players outside of the adult/player relationship.
  • Refrain from using abusive, derogatory or offensive language.
  • Impart knowledge and skills of the game in a respectful and encouraging manner.
  • Respect the decisions of Midnight Basketball Australia, the Committee and other officials and encourage players to do the same.
  • Always consider the health, safety and welfare of the players.

 

Policy and Procedure for Handling Disclosures or Suspicions of Harm

The following policy and procedures will ensure that everyone responds as quickly as possible and in the best interests of the child or young person under 18 years of age, when disclosures or suspicions of harm are received. Midnight Basketball Australia recognises that children and young people are vulnerable members of the community and that extra measures must be taken to protect and support them.

Definitions

Harm may be categorised in the following types:

  • physical abuse, for example, beating, shaking, burning, biting, causing bruise or fractures by inappropriate discipline, giving children alcohol, drugs or inappropriate medication;
  • emotional or psychological abuse, for example, constant yelling, insults, swearing, criticism, bullying, not giving children positive support and encouragement;
  • neglect, for example, not giving children sufficient food, clothing, enough sleep, hygiene, medical care, leaving children alone or children missing school; and
  • sexual abuse or exploitation, for example, sexual jokes or touching, exposing children to sexual acts or pornography or having sexual intercourse with a child or young person under 16 years of age (even if the child appears to have consented).

Suspicion of harm

You can suspect harm if you are concerned by significant changes in behaviour or the presence of new unexplained and suspicious injuries.

Disclosure of harm

A disclosure of harm occurs when someone, including a child, tells you about harm that has happened or is likely to happen.

Disclosures of harm may start with:

  • “I think I saw…”
  • “Somebody told me that…”
  • “Just think you should know…”
  • “I’m not sure what I want you to do, but…”

Procedures to minimise harm to children and young people

Our organisation works to minimise harm to children and young people by acting in a manner that supports their interests and wellbeing, by:

  • making sure that children know that it is their right to feel safe at all times;
  • teaching them about acceptable and unacceptable behaviour in general;
  • letting them know who is and who is not an employee in the organisation;
  • allowing them to be a part of decision-making processes;
  • making sure they are safe by monitoring their activities and ensuring their environment meets all safety requirements;
  • taking anything a child or young person says seriously and following up their concerns;
  • letting them know there is no secret too awful, no story too terrible, that they can’t share with someone they trust;
  • teaching them about appropriate and inappropriate contact in a manner appropriate to their age and level of understanding;
  • teaching children and young people to say ‘no’ to anything that makes them feel unsafe;
  • encouraging them to tell staff of any suspicious activities or people; and
  • listening to children and young people and letting them know that staff are available for them if they have any concerns.

Procedures for receiving a disclosure of harm

When receiving a disclosure of harm:

  • remain calm and find a private place to talk;
  • don’t promise that you’ll keep a secret; tell them they have done the right thing in telling you but that you’ll need to tell someone who can help keep them safe;
  • only ask enough questions to confirm the need to report the matter; probing questions could cause distress, confusion and interfere with any later enquiries; and
  • do not attempt to conduct your own investigation or mediate an outcome between the parties involved.

 

Reporting Guidelines for Disclosures or Suspicions of Harm

Following are the actions our organisation will take immediately following a disclosure or suspicion of harm.

Documenting a suspicion of harm

If you or others have concerns about the safety of a child, record your concerns in a non-judgmental and accurate manner as soon as possible. If a parent explains a noticeable mark on a child, record your own observations as well as accurate details of the conversation. If you see unsafe or harmful actions towards a child in your care, intervene immediately, provided it is safe to do so. If it is unsafe, call the police for assistance.

Documenting a disclosure of harm

Discuss with the Committee Chair or the Tournament Night Manager how to complete a Midnight Basketball incident report form or record the details as soon as possible so that they are accurately captured. Include:

  • time, date and place of the disclosure;
  • ‘word for word’ what happened and what was said, including anything you said and any actions that have been taken; and
  • date of report and signature.

If you do not wish to enter this information into the Tournament System due to the sensitivy of the information, discuss with your Committee Chair and notify Midnight Basketball Australia.

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APPLYING FOR A WWC CHECK

The process for applying for a WWC Check is different in each state. Links to the appropriate State departments are provided below.

New South Wales

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC Check

Notes on completing your application:

  • For 'Child-related sector' select 'Clubs or other bodies providing services to children'.
  • Ensure details entered exactly match details on your identity documents.
  • If you are undertaking a paid role you must hold a paid (Employee) clearance.

 

Northern Territory

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC Check

Notes on completing your application:

  • For 'Category of Child-related work' select category Number 7 (Clubs, associations or movements with significant child membership or involvement, including groups that are of cultural, recreational or sporting nature)
  • If you are undertaking a Paid role you will need pay the application fee of $55.00

 

Queensland

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC Check

Notes on completing your application:

  • Enter the following on behalf of the Volunteer Manager:
    • PART A: Select 'Volunteer' (If undertaking a paid role you must select 'Paid employee')
    • PART B: Enter the following information:
      • Name of Organisation: Midnight Basketball Australia
      • Postal Address: GPO Box 1600, Sydney NSW 2001
      • Contact person's name: Amber Holliday
      • Contact person's position: Communities Support Manager
      • Telephone: 02 8052 9504
      • Email: info@midnightbasketball.org.au
    • PART C: Select 'Health, counselling and support services (including disability services)'

 

South Australia

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC  Check

 

Victoria

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC Check

Notes on completing your application:

  • For 'Organisation Details' list: 'Midnight Basketball Australia, GPO Box 1600 Sydney NSW 2001 Phone: 02 8052 9504'
  • For 'Occupational work codes' select: '24 Child protection services'

 

Western Australia

WWC Information

Apply for a WWC Check

Notes on completing your application (Volunteer Manager to complete):

  • PART 5:
    • Category of Child Related Work: 12
    • Type of Employment: 'Volunteer/Unpaid Position'
      • Note: if you are contacted by a professional role ask them to complete this form with their employer, eg, catering company, Basketball Assn, Security company and then provide their WWC Card number and expiry date to you once received.
    • Name of Organisation for which you undertake child-related work: Midnight Basketball [Community]
    • Applicant's job title/role in child-related work: Volunteer
    • Organisation's Phone Number: 02 9908 9181
  • PART 6:
    • Name of Employer/Volunteer Organisation or Education Provider Representative: [Volunteer Manager Name]
    • Position of Employer/Volunteer Organisation or Education Provider Representative: Volunteer Manager
    • Street Address of Employer/Volunteer Organisation or Education Provider Representative: [add Stadium address]
    • Postal Address of Employer/Volunteer Organisation or Education Provider Representative:
    • Position to whom your notice will be sent: Communities Support Manager
    • Address: GPO Box 1600, Sydney NSW 2001
  • PART 7: Date and sign

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